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This support article demonstrates how to remove keystroke delimiters from the idChamp™ RS3 Dual Engine RFID Reader with the RS3-NFC Setup application for iOS. This tutorial assumes that you have already installed the RS3-NFC Setup application for iOS. If you have not already done so, please do so now. Adjust the DIP Switches for BLE Mode You must set the idChamp™ RS3's DIP switches to BLE mode in order to adjust the configuration with the RS3-NFC Setup application for iOS. To see how to do this, click here. Once the RS3 is in BLE mode, you can continue to the next…
Select A Terminal Application Before we begin, it's important that you make sure that you have a compatible terminal emulator installed on your computer. Here, at Serialio, we often use our product, JavaTerm. This obviously is not required — there is a myriad of different terminal emulators (for Mac and Windows) that will do just fine. If you don't know where to start,  we recommend YAT (Yet Another Terminal) for Windows and zTerm for Mac. Configure The Terminal  As many of you likely know, serial devices and the respective application/hardware used to communicate with them must…
This app note demonstrates how to connect the WiSnap RS-232 dongle via Wi-Fi to an Android AP (access point) that is connected to the internet via a 3G/4G cellular network. To clarify, we are going to set up the Android device (with access to a cellular network) as a Wi-Fi access point, then configure the WiSnap (via RS-232 connection and terminal application) to connect to the Android's Wi-Fi access point. This way, the WiSnap will be able to connect to the Internet through the Android's cellular network. Set up the Wi-Fi access point (AP) on the Android device 1. Launch the Settings…
To configure the WiSnap adapter for software access point mode follow the below steps: 1. Connect the WiSnap adapter to your PC using a USB-RS232 cable. 2. Configure your terminal application (PuTTY, TeraTerm, etc.) with the settings: 9600 baud 8 data bits 1 stop bit no parity no flow control 3. Start the terminal application. 4. Type the following commands followed by a carriage return (enter key): $$$ - should see a CMD response and the green LED will begin blinking quickly set wlan ssid - sets the SSID of the WiSnap when in AP mode set wlan chan 0…
The WiSnap WiFi to RS232 adapter can be used to configure devices such as Cisco switches and routers using an iPad. Here we have configured a WiSnap AAA adapter using software AP mode to connect to a Cisco Catalyst 2950 switch on the console cable. We then connect through any Telnet app to send configuration commands. Click here to configure the WiSnap adapter in soft AP mode. The WiSnap adapter is acting as an access point and DHCP server. The WiSnap adapter is configured on IP 10.10.1.50 and automatically assigns an IP of 10.10.1.60 to the iPhone 6 used in this example. Connect to the…
Many of our customers want to know just how secure Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) — or Bluetooth Smart/Bluetooth 4.0 — communication is. In response, we've made this article to provide basic information about the BLE standard, what it entails and what it means for your security concerns. The BLE Pairing Process How does Bluetooth Low Energy pairing work? Generally, the process of pairing two BLE or Bluetooth Smart devices consists of three phases; the information exchange, key generation and transport-specific key generation. Phase One: Information Exchange The first phase…
RFID Tags RFID tags consist of two primary components; a microchip that processes and stores the information/data and an antenna to receive and transmit RFID radio-wave signals. To read information from the tag/label, a two-way radio-receiver called an interrogator (or reader) sends a radio-wave signal to the tag(s) using its antenna. Tags that are within range of the interrogator's signal will respond with the data stored in its memory. Most RFID tags are passive tags, which use the energy from the interrogator's signal to relay its stored information. Alternatively, battery-…
This support article demonstrates how to retrieve device information (in this case, we are retrieving information from the idChamp RS3) by using the yACK BLE app for iOS to send the get al command. The yACK BLE application is also available on Android. See our article on this same process with the Android version of yACK BLE. 1. First, make sure that the device is in BLE mode. The yACK BLE application only works with Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE). 2. Install the yACK BLE application from the App Store. Then, launch yACK BLE. 3. Power on your device. 4. yACK…
NOTE: You can sideload an app from any computer and not lose existing data (e.g. does not need to be performed on the computer your iOS device is synced with) 1. Open iTunes 2. Connect iOS device to computer and view inside iTunes by clicking on the name of the iOS device in the upper right-hand corner. 3. Click on the Apps tab. 4. In Windows Explorer, open the folder containing the .ipa file and double-click the file. 5. In iTunes, the app name will appear in the list. 6. Click the “Install” button. It should now say “Will Install” and the app icon should…
1. Launch iScanBrowser, Cloud-In-Hand Mobile Grid, or SerialMagic Gears. 2. Navigate to the Serial Device Manager (SDM). 3. Power on your RS4 and add it As a connection to the SDM. 4. Once the RS4 is connected, tap on the gear icon (located to the far-right of the Bluetooth name). 5. Tap on RS4 CSN/PACS Credential Type. 6. Select HID 37-bit/40-bit/iClass CSN.
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